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The Dunstan Times Webnews

New Zealand

 

 

     
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The endemic flightless kiwi is a national icon

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The All Blacks perform a haka before a match against France in 2006

See Explanation.  Clicking on the picture will download
 the highest resolution version available.
A Lenticular Cloud Over New Zealand : What's happening above those mountains? Several clouds are stacked up into one striking lenticular cloud. Normally, air moves much more horizontally than it does vertically. Sometimes, however, such as when wind comes off of a mountain or a hill, relatively strong vertical oscillations take place as the air stabilizes. The dry air at the top of an oscillation may be quite stratified in moisture content, and hence forms clouds at each layer where the air saturates with moisture. The result can be a lenticular cloud with a strongly layered appearance. The above picture was taken in 2002 looking southwest over the Tararua Range mountains from North Island, New Zealand.

Make sure you're counted among the 4,000,000-plus New Zealanders. Every One Counts is a global census targeting expat Kiwis and their families. Copy the following link into your browser to see a neat little clip (http://www.everyonecounts.co.nz/movie.html) and to find out more details about how you can be counted. C'mon Expat Kiwi's!
Hello all, there is going to be the inaugural golf match between old boys of wgtn coll and st pats coll on 29 May 2008 at Miramar Golf course. if you are interested in playing send an e-mail to me. regards Ian de Terte (ian@psych.net.nz) Had envisioned starting my own business since early in 1975. Business grew well as I focused on it, and customers liked and trusted me and easily remebered me for annual maintenance which was my main breadwinner. Started my air-conditioning side (Dynamic Air in 1987) which really exploded my business growth. By 2000 business slowed as customers started dying off and car accident neck whiplash pain gradually negated my abilities.

About Michael  54 years old and living in Canada. After W.College 1971 I travelled all over NZ and returned to Canada in 1973. I started a heating -cooling business in Brampton, Ontario in 1979. Now I am quietly slipping into retirement mode. Still in the midst of writing my biography, when I get a chance I am building a family tree history dunstan-times000.tripod.com Love studying astronomy,quantum mechanics and of course gamma ray bursts especially the short GRB's, they really are awesome! I ride my bicycle almost every day, reminise of my N.Z. days and still hope to return for my 2011 40 years on WCOB reunion.Still looking for contacts as I am still looking to add chapters to my book! Do any readers know of people such as Christopher Walker and Mark Bennett from Wellington College from the days ending in 1971. Started and ran as a non profit help for tenants after a run-in with the landlord from hell, had to read and learn: won lots of cases, even against big shot lawyers. Basically I won cases by repeatedly questioning issues, taking photos and always carrying a pocket tape-recorder. Won first place overall in Canada wide Brimaco Junior Superbike Series of 1980. All I got was a trophy and a blue bike jacket. The win however led to sponsoship from Barr Hodges (Superbike Centre). We raced mostly at Shannonville and Mt. Tremblant(Ste. Jovite)Went pro in 1982? raced Daytona, Indianapolis, Circuit Gilles Villenueuve (saw him race) Mosport and Ohio.

Holiday season is upon us, with a hint of summer too. The final newsletter for the year is full of inspiration, and ideas of ways to challenge yourself in the New Year. Our feature article is great for thinking about how to balance your life,

Milford Sound, New Zealand's most famous tourist destination[38especially at this time of the year.

Wishing you happy holidays and an exciting 2009 from all the team at Outward Bound.

Wellington Round the Bays Fun Run/Walk         15th Feb 2009                                 
½ marathon, 10km, or 5km
www.wellingtonroundthebays.co.nz

Oxfam Trailwalkers                                          4th & 5th April 09                      
Help make this event happen or be a participant
www.oxfamtrailwalker.org.nz

St Johns Event Volunteer                                  Various
Build first aid skills and help others have great events
www.stjohn.org.nz

WOMAD music festival                                     14-16th March 09                      
Volunteer and help run this event
www.womad.co.nz



Corsair Classic                                                 21-02-09                                  
Ocean swim challenge Corsair Bay, Christchurch
www.oceanswim.co.nz

Hen & Chicken Islands Weeding                         Nov - Feb                  
Spend 10days on these islands helping DOC preserve their Nature Reserve
www.doc.govt.nz

For a list of other volunteering opportunities
www.volunteernow.org.nzCongratulations to David Mangnall, Outward Bound’s Training Manager, who is the recipient of the NZOIA 2008 Tall Totara Award.

The Tall Totara is an annual award made by the NZ Outdoor Instructors Association to a member to recognise:    
• contribution to outdoor instructing
• consistent excellence in outdoor instructing  and
• promotion of the objectives of NZOIA.

In his role as Training Manager, David is responsible for staff selection, and running a two month induction training programme.  “He ‘walks the talk’, is unfailingly professional and doesn’t hesitate to get wet, cold and dirty to demonstrate with ease any skill required in this job”
 - Outward Bound Instructor, Jen Riley. 

Major cities and towns in New Zealand



Fat Freddy’s Drop

MIHIRANGI

    isn't it an incredible privilege living in Aoteaora/NZ that we don't have to travel too far to find the ocean that surrounds our land.  We all enjoy the sound of the sea lapping on our shores and the great sunsets to the West over the seas.   Yep, for me personally it would be good if we as a nation readdressed the inbalance between national parks and marine parks.  1% is such a small figure when it comes to our marine environment.  Research shows us that fish and other marine life stocks recover in a protected marine sanctuary and the benefits flow on and assist the area outside of marine reserves to replenish as well  

Sensei William Young - Head Instructor

Training Venue Contact Phone Kilbirnie Dojo Contact 021-290-0016Johnsonville/Newlands Dojo 027-440-2634

Phone:

(04) 383-6348

       

 

c/- 25 Arun crescent

Email:

wyoung1409 -at- hotmail.com Mike,
We're a "dime a dozen" now, and far from from being a big shot. The highest Goju Ryu grade in NZ is now Dennis May, also an ex Rembuden guy, ex Higaonna, ex Jundokan Okinawa guy who is now an 8th Dan graded by Miyazato Sensei (dec'd) of the Jundokan.
Merry Christmas  William Young

Rembuden Karate
Kilbirnie

  

 

.

  

Life is really so amazing, I have checked out your website, nicely put together by the way! So, it turns out you are a big shot in the karate world! I am impressed! The pic of this kick really turns my crank...awesome. Will feature it somewhere on my messy site dunstan-times000.tripod with your permission. Will give you a quick call when I hit Wellington just to say hi. Any old Wellington Y judo guys you could give them my email. In Oldfriends no-one but I have posted anything about it! We were quite the club back then.
Anyway thanks for the email, sure you are busy. Keep up the good stuff. Mike

I don't think we actually trained together. I joined Rembuden under Sensei Jarvis in 1975, and was trained by Jarvis Sensei, Mike Riddell and Kevin Warne, and Sensei Higaonna of Okinawa Goju Ryu Karate which all Rembuden Dojos converted to in 1977. John, Mike and Kevin have retired now. By the sounds of it, you must have belonged to the Budokan, under Pat Toner. His Dojo split up after the premises in Edward Street (off Willis Street or Victoria Streets) closed down. Dave Downes moved the Karate side to Newtown Community Centre, and Pat, well, kinda retired, but made a come back again later with the either the Wellington Judo and Ju jitsu academy or the new Budokan which uses a Kyokushinkai Karate. He runs a Retail shop in Courtenay Place called Made in Nippon.

Rembuden Kilbirnie is a completely independent Okinawa Goju Ryu Karate Dojo. It is not associated with any other Rembuden Clubs, or individuals purporting to be "Chairman" of such. We operate as a non profit club. Our primary goal being to teach students the art of Okinawa Goju Ryu Karate. The Dojo continues to subscribe to the teachings of Master Chojun Miyagi, with a complete absence of Karate Boardroom Kumite. Sensei John Jarvis  spent 2 years in London (1965) studying Karate with Steve Arneil (the then Head of UK Kyokushinkai Karate) before travelling to Japan to train under the late world famous Master Mas Oyama. Jarvis Sensei was the 5th person in the world to complete the 100 man fight and was graded 5th Dan by Oyama Sensei. Refer www.masutatsuoyama.com/100mankumite.htm

Outward Bound Cereal

Several months ago, Hubbards changed the Outward Bound pack. Hubbards hope that you have seen the new Outward Bound pack and have found it easy to find on the supermarket shelves. If you are a Hubbards Outward Bound cereal eater, the folk at Hubbards would really appreciate your comments about the pack, and the cereal

kiwisteven (1548 ) WELLINGTON, N.Z. View from hills. Real photo.

Scenic New Zealand Series. by N.S.Seaward's Studio, Broad bay, Dunedin
99.6% positive feedback
Member since June 2003
 

On Endeavour's maiden voyage in August 1768, Cook sailed to the South Pacific (to observe and record the infrequent event of the planet Venus passing between the Earth and the sun). Determining the transit of Venus enabled early astronomers to find the distance of the sun from the Earth, which then could be used as a unit of measurement in calculating the parameters of the universe. The ENDEAVOUR departed England in 1768 and after visiting Tahiti the following year he discovered New Zealand and claimed it for Great Britain. In 1769, Cook was the first person to fully chart New Zealand (which was previously visited in 1642 by the Dutchman Abel Tasman from the Dutch province of Zeeland). Cook also surveyed the eastern coast of Australia , navigated the Great Barrier Reef and traveled to Hawaii. RESOLUTION and ADVENTURE, June 1772

Ko au te whenua, ko te whenua ko au  I am the land and the land is me

A dependence on the natural environment is why, how and what makes Outward Bound New Zealand possible, however it is also what makes our way of life as New Zealanders possible. A fundamental objective of Outward Bound is to expose our students, to a wide and varied number of experiences in the environment, land, fresh air and water; and to provide an understanding of the inter-relatedness of the processes that support natural local, national and global ecosystems.

Also, most importantly, it is to provide an insight into long term sustainability, our personal responsibility towards our environmental behaviour and how this behaviour relates to positive and negative impacts on the environment. 
Hubbards Carbon Crusade

Show us you care! Give back to our environment with the Hubbards Carbon Crusade! Just what you need after gaining motivation from our lead article!

The Hubbards Carbon Crusade is a national series of events, for everyday people, involving walking or running off-road for about 15kms, and planting four trees. It's not a competition, but more about doing something together, and showing that we care.

Congratulations to Scott Watch from C33 (1966) and Hillary watch from MBS45 (2004).   These two groups have won a reunion in Anakiwa by getting most of their watch registered in MyWatchmates and winning the prize draw.   Outward Bound staff in Anakiwa are very excited to be hosting both reunions in mid August.  We will bring you photos and stories from this event in our 2nd edition.Bring it on!  An 8 or 21 day adventure for adults.21 days of exhilaration on our Classic or Mind Body Soul courses.

              

               

              

Being the caretakers of a "clean, green land" is a responsibility New Zealanders take seriously.

No one -- not even country music superstar Shania Twain -- is exempt from regulations designed to protect the South Pacific paradise. Recently Twain had to agree to rigorous conditions before she and her husband, record producer Mutt Lange, were granted permission to build a home on a ranch they leased for about $20 million. The conditions include replacing dying plants and trees, and building a public walking track through the Wanaka-area sheep station.

While protecting the environment is the right thing to do, it also makes good business sense in a country where agriculture, food processing, winemaking and tourism are key sectors of the economy, says Christine Brown of Destination Marlborough.

Located near the top of the South Island, Marlborough is best known for its wineries, its gourmet food products and a maze of pristine coves and inlets called Marlborough Sounds.

The area attracts sailors, eco-tourists and wine tourists, says Brown over lunch at A boat docked in the picturesque harbour of Picton

The view of Queen Charlotte Sound from Karaka Point.My travelling companions and I choose to explore aboard Sail Marlborough's 17-metre luxury sailing yacht -- Caro Vita -- skippered by Jo Ivory. A lifelong sailor and former racer, the 40-something Ivory has been showing people the Sounds since buying Caro Vita with her husband, Patrick, last year. The boat takes up to 14 people for day trips and has sleeping quarters for eight. Today, one of Ivory's two sons serves as first-mate. Nelson is also home to Jens Hansen Gold and Silversmith, which created the One Ring for The Lord of the Rings trilogy. Jens and his son, Thorkild, actually made 40 rings for the film -- from solid gold versions for the Hobbits' fingers, to the 17-cm gold-plated one seen spinning in the air in the prologue. The real One Ring was not engraved. The Elvish inscription seen in the movie is a special effect. The ring was one of Jens' last creations before his death in 1999. Dozens of smaller studios in the area are also open to the public. Even our host at Sunnybank Homestead has an artistic streak. Margaret Johnston has two pieces in the WOW collection and work in progress at the luxury B&B. Many of her paintings hang in the home and you can often catch her sculpting in the garden. See sunnybank.co.nz for more. Art is not the only thing for visitors to see. Abel Tasman National Park has some of the most spectacular scenery in the world. The park is renowned for its golden beaches, granite cliffs, and coastal walking track. Trekkers can camp along the way. But for those who want a pampered adventure, Awaroa Lodge is in the middle of the track. We flew in on a four-seater Cessna, landing on grass near the boutique hotel, which has 26 "bach style" rooms that blend into the wetland environment. Living in a national park has made lodge employees ecologically aware, said then manager Cameron Trott. "We strive to be as self sufficient as possible. We grow our own organic produce. Power is generated on site," Trott says. Depending on the season, nightly rates run from $210 for two to $380 for a family room. See awaroalodge.co.nz. After a lunch of pan-seared grouper, we head off down the track to the prize at the end of the rainbow -- Onetahuti beach, a wide, pristine strip of ochre-coloured sand. From there we catch an aqua taxi back to so-called civilization. BOTTOM LINE GETTING THERE: Air New Zealand has several Internet promotions for Canadian travellers, including:  See ca.airnewzealand.com. MORE INFO: For New Zealand travel information, visit newzealand.com. For the Marlborough area, see destinationmarlborough.com.

!

t

Anniversary Day Auckland

 

Auckland

.visit our history at......http://fachefiles.tripod.com/
6B2 (1971) Uploaded by Barry Annandale
If you are in this photo then you can link your name to your profile


Row 3 
?  ?  ?  Kerry Annandale  ?  ?  ?  ? 
Row 2 
Hoss  John Lane  ?  ?  ?  Richard Wardle  Wong  ?  ?  Hill 
Row 1 
?  ?  ?  ?  David Lane  Con Anastasiou  ? 
4C (1969) Uploaded by Andrew Marchant
If you are in this photo then you can link your name to your profile


Row 4 
Craig Watts  Tony Rabie  Ken Broom  ? Pickles  ?  Eddie Ng  George Bertos 
Row 3 
Wayne King  ?  ?  ? Benge  ?  ?  ? Bliss  ?  ? 
Row 2 
Charlie McKay  George Bolt  ?  ?  ?  ?  ? Allen  Andy Marchant 
Row 1 
?  Alan Thompson  ?  David Archer  ? Crawford  Doug ? Hunter  Dave Wilson  ? McCallum 

George Bertos was in 6b6 with me in 1971

Mark Bennet drummer/friend

5 Sh B (1970) Uploaded by Barry Annandale
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Row 3 
Max Carpenter  Peter Saxton  Peter Gaskin  Phil Matsopolous  ?  Adrian Bell  Kerry Annandale  Peter Castle  Amose Tollo  ? 
Row 2 
Rocky Serafim  Geofrey Harrison  ?  ?  George Floratos  Glen Wells(dec'd)  Evan Cunliffe  Robert Vance  ?  ?  Richard Tunnecliffe 
Row 1 
Adam McSweeny  ?  ?  ?  Derek Schneiderman  Melvin Parun  ?  ?  ?  ? 

Wgtn College Old Boys Under 21s ~Runners Up (1973) Uploaded by Theo Naziris
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Row 4 
Grant Guppy  Doug Braddock  John Macaskill  Lindsay Rainbird  R Heeps  
Row 3 
Paul Robinson  Kevin Morris  A Fitchett  John Lambert  Charles Lambert  Nigel Taylor 
Row 2 
Neil Fredrickson  Bill Armour  Dave Ramsden (Captain)  Neil Livingstone ( Coach)  Mike Shepherd (Vice-Captain)  Peter Conway  Clive Ramage 
Row 1 
Baz Morris   Grae Thompson  Theo Naziris  Chris Gaskill 
On Endeavour's maiden voyage in August 1768, Cook sailed to the South Pacific (to observe and record the infrequent event of the planet Venus passing between the Earth and the sun). Determining the transit of Venus enabled early astronomers to find the distance of the sun from the Earth, which then could be used as a unit of measurement in calculating the parameters of the universe. The ENDEAVOUR departed England in 1768 and after visiting Tahiti the following year he discovered New Zealand and claimed it for Great Britain. In 1769, Cook was the first person to fully chart New Zealand (which was previously visited in 1642 by the Dutchman Abel Tasman from the Dutch province of Zeeland). Cook also surveyed the eastern coast of Australia , navigated the Great Barrier Reef and traveled to Hawaii.
RESOLUTION and ADVENTURE, June 1772

Wellington College was informed this morning, that former Headmaster Seddon Hill passed away peacefully last night (3/9/07) in Taupo, aged 90.  His funeral service will be this Friday, 7 September 2007 at St Andrew’s Anglican Church, Taupo at 2.30pm.... I will always remember my two visits to his huge and cluttered office as per my "wild" behaviour. #1 wearing my red GDHS wrestling jacket to school; #2 holding hands with a girl in public. On my second visit he advised the then hairy 18 year old that the cane would be implemented on my next visit; I smiled in response.

"Joan Stevens" <joanss@xtra.co.nz>  View Contact Details  View Contact Details
To: "mike milne" <spacermike00@yahoo.ca>
Subject: fache facts
Date: Sun, 3 Jul 2005 21:56:39 +1200
from the Wakatipu Mail   Tues July 27 1915
 
A very familiar and much respected figure on the Otago goldfields, in the person of Mr Geo Fache, passed away on Sunday evening last at Kawarau Falls Station where he had been residing with his daughter Mrs J P McBride. Deceased gentleman had been ailing for 6 months past and his extreme age told against his infirmities.  Though he received all the care that it was possible to give, deceased endured much suffering, and death came as a happy release. The late Mr Fache was born in the West End of London.  He came out to the Dominion nearly 55 years ago and was attracted to the Gabriels Gully and Dunstan gold rushes.  At Clyde Mr Fache founded the Dunstan Times in 1862 which he ably conducted until 1895.  He also carried on an auctioneering and commission agency as well as the paper.  After relinquishing the Times the deceased retained the latter business.  He eventually sold up and commenced along the same lines at Wellington.  After 3 years he went back to Clyde and again re-opened on a moderate scale.  It is now a year or so that the deceased retired into private life, living amongst the members of his family. The late Mr Fache identified himself with the township of Clyde assisting materially to furthur any object which went for advancement.  He moreover proved himself a popular townsman.  Deceased was a widower and leaves a family of 3 sons and 4 daughters.  The sons are Mr Geo Fache Commissioner of Pensions Wellington,  Mr Sydney Fache Officer in National Mortgage and Agency Co, Palmerston South, and Mr Bert Fache who is a member of one of the NZ Expeditionary Forces.  The daughters are Mrs Charles of Mataura,  Mrs J F McBride Kawarau Falls Station Frankton, Mrs A Mitchell Lammerburn Clutha, and Miss Fache post mistress at Waipiata Central Otago. Very general sympathy is expressed for the familyin their bereavement.  The remains will be interred in the Frankton Cemetery. 
 
From our genealogy marriage records    Ethel May Fache aged 31 m. McBride 1912
                                                          Eve Gertrude  Fache         m. Charles 1907
                                                          Iris Isobel  Fache  aged 30 m. Mitchell 1915
                                                          George Fache m. Lizzie Cox 24 Oct 1868
 
From local  death registration records    2 May 1872  William Michael Fache inflammation of the bowels aged 6 weeks b. NZ  Informant W Fache
                                                          3 Aug 1881 William Fache printer of Clyde.  Stricture of the urethra aged 52  b. Eng. Informant G Fache
                                                          4 Jan 1891 Elizabeth Cecilia Fache dau. of Geo Fache of Clyde  Tuberculous meningitis aged 14
                                                              Informant G Fache
                                                          11 Aug 1914  Mrs Fache wife of G C Fache at Ophir of childbirth. Resident of Ida Valley born NZ   
 
Hope this is useful for the family tree     Regards  Joan Stevens

Date: Tue, 12 Apr 2005 14:21:38 +1200
From: "Nigel Murphy" <nigel.murphy@natlib.govt.nz>
To: spacermike00@yahoo.ca
Subject: Dunstan Times
Dear Mike Milne,Your email of 11 April 2005 asked about putting the Dunstan Times
                                    (1864-1948) on our Papers Past site.  Unfortunately there are no plans
                                    to do this at the present.  We hold a portion of the Times on microfilm
                                    - 1890-1939 to be precise.  I'm not sure if that's the period you are
                                    interested in. If it is you could interloan the microfilm through
                                    international interlibrary loan.  Alternatively you could email us with
                                    details on your gg grandfather that you would like researched.
                                    Yours sincerely,Nigel Murphy
                                    Librarian New Zealand & Pacific Published Collections
                                    ALEXANDER TURNBULL LIBRARY
                                    New Zealand ph: 04 4743000
Rosemary Shivnan" <Rosemary.Shivnan@natlib.govt.nz>  Add to Address BookAdd to Address Book
To:spacermike00@yahoo.ca
Subject:Fache family

                                    
Hodgkins, William Mathew, 1833-1898 The Dunstan Flat, from the Knobby's Track, 1864.
19 May 2005 Dear Mr Milne FACHE FAMILY Your email dated 11 May 2005 requested information on the above family, in particular the arrival of George Fache to New Zealand. On receipt of a postal address I can mail you the following photocopies referring to George Cox Fache: · 'New Zealand obituaries', v 34, pp 137, 138 · New Zealand free lance, 19 December 1903, p 4d In attempting to ascertain an arrival date for the family in New Zealand, I tried to check for the earliest evidence of George Fache (Snr.) residing in the country. A check of V Maxwell's Settlers to Otago pre 1861 was unsuccessful. There appears to be conflicting references to his tenure as proprietor of the Dunstan times. According to the Cyclopedia of New Zealand (Christchurch, 1902), v 4, p 721, the Dunstan times was founded by G Fache in 1862. However, D R Harvey's Union list of newspapers preserved in libraries, newspaper offices, local authority offices and museums in New Zealand (Wellington, 1987) lists the publishing dates of the Dunstan news and Wakatip advertiser as 30 December 1862 -ca.1864 and the Dunstan times as February? 1864-24 May 1948.
Artist unknown [Gold-min
ContentsShows Clutha River at left, apparently with flying fox suspended over it. In centre foreground is a line of washing out to dry, and at right two simple huts. In background beneath a cliff face is a settlement of possibly 30 or 40 huts. In left distance a range of high hills extends to top of picture.
Other TitlesHartley & Riley 1862 Gold strike on the banks of the Molyneux River (now the Clutha River) - between Clyde and Cromwell
General NotesHas been attributed to William Mathew Hodgkins.
While exact location remains to be identified, the scene may be a rare view of the Dunstan (Clyde) diggings. Appears to show a gold mining settlement in Central Otago, an area of interest to William Mathew Hodgkins. The publication "Dunstan Goldfields centennial review" includes a photograph of the official opening of the Hartley and Riley Memorial cairn, taken from a similar viewpoint.
NamesSisarich, Warren fl 1980s-1990s; as the donor/lender/vendor
Hodgkins, William Mathew, 1833?-1898; as an attributed artist
Hodgkins family; as the previous owner
Hartley, Horatio, 1826-1903 ; as a related subject
Reilly, Christopher fl 1862; as a related subject
SubjectsGold mines and mining - Otago Region
Laundry
Flying foxes
Rivers - Otago Region
Dwellings - Otago Region
PlacesDunstan
ing village in Central Otago, probably Hartley & Riley's Dunstan diggings on the Clutha. 1862?]
Also enclosed is a photocopy of pages 199-200 from G H Scholefield's Newspapers in New Zealand (Wellington, 1958) referring to these two newspapers. These references suggest he arrived some time before 1862 or 1864. The Otago Settlers Museum, PO Box 566, Dunedin holds indexes to Otago arrivals from 1848-1863 and may be able to help you further. It is possible that George Fache's death certificate may note how many years he had resided in New Zealand. The Registrar General's Births, deaths and marriages indexes (Lower Hutt, 1986), includes a death registered at Wakatipu for a George Fache in 1915 (folio no. 2457). You may wish to apply for this certificate via the Births, deaths and marriages website www.bdm.govt.nz . There are several references to members of the Fache family in M J Kelly's Births, marriages, deaths from the Dunstan times 1866-1900 (Auckland, 1991). These can be photocopied for you at a cost of fifty cents per page.
Mail coach, and passengers, about to leave the township of Dunstan (now known as Clyde) for Roxburgh, circa 1880s. The Dunstan Hotel is alongside, and the Hartley Arms Hotel is also just visible.M
Vincent Aspey and Alex Lindsay wearing their MBE medals
ail coach about to leave the township of Dunstan






Staff in the Manuscripts and Archives Section report that TAPUHI, the online database of the Library's unpublished collections, has been checked on your behalf. TAPUHI can be accessed at
http://tapuhi.natlib.govt.nz. One folder containing material relating to George Fache has been located among the Royal Forest and Bird Protection Society of New Zealand Records (MS-Group-0206). The folder, Visit to Australia - Mr Fache (MS-Papers-0444-684), contains material relating to a visit to Australia by Mr Fache in 1946-1947 when he was a vice-president of the Forest and Bird Society. This material deals with Australia's regulations regarding the control of wildlife and does not contain biographical material about Mr Fache. Access to this collection is restricted and requires the permission of the General Manager of the Royal Forest and Bird Protection Society. Staff in Turnbull Library Pictures have checked files for photographs of George Fache and of Dunstan or Clyde. There are no photographs of George Fache, but there are two of Ada Howard Fache who may be a family member. There is also a selection of photocopies of Clyde that may be of interest to you.

 Our newspaper was started in 1862 by George Fache, an original settler in New Zealand.It was named the"Dunstan Times", as Clyde was previously named Dunstan. The shop was located on Sunderland Street, Clyde. This journal was founded in 1862 by Mr. G. Fache, who conducted it till 1895. The premises were on freehold land, and consisted of a wooden building, which contained a Wharfedale printing press and a complete jobbing plant. The paper was a weekly publication of eight pages of seven columns, and had a wide circulation throughout Central Otago. I have been wading (drowning) through miles of NZ history to find info photos of my family "Fache" who became influential from the 1860's in Dunstan and then spread out. I have had little success. Can you share anything from your findings. mike

On your bike, if you can find it
The first enthusiastic young entrants take the plunge for the 200m swim off St Heliers Beach. Picture / Martin Sykes
The first enthusiastic entrants take the plunge for the 200m swim off St Heliers Beach.
Children do the hard yards, but usually it's the parents who end up exhausted.

The cycling transition stage of the Weet-Bix Tryathlon in St Heliers was the worst for parents. They clustered about the wire fence separating them from their dripping children fresh from the 200m swim.

There were 4400 bikes in there.

Some people were canny and attached coloured balloons or flags to make the bikes easier to spot.

Others were not.

"She can't find her bike," parents wail. "It's to the left," they yell. "Wrong row, Chloe."

"HELMET, Michelle."

Finally, the children head off down Tamaki Drive and the parents can rest for the 8km ride before they have to renew cheering for the 1.5km run.

Some parents have been here before and have the logistics of a Weet-Bix Tryathlon, now in its 13th year, down to a fine art.

Kerry Ludlam is one of these. Her older children, now 15 and 17, started doing the tryathlons when they were 8. She has had nine years to perfect plans, so was up at 5.30am and in St Heliers by 7am with her son Brendon, 11.

Love is in the air for TVNZ
The Insiders Guide to Happiness, received acclaim for its quirky themes and characters.
The Insiders Guide to Happiness, received acclaim for its quirky themes and characters.
 
15.03.05
 
TVNZ has been given the go-ahead from New Zealand on Air for a new series of the acclaimed New Zealand drama The Insiders Guide. The first series, The Insiders Guide to Happiness, received acclaim for its quirky themes and characters. In the new series, The Insiders Guide to Love, seven previously unconnected people are affected by a bizarre incident, the outcome of which forces them to examine and explore the loves that are at the core of their lives. But not just romantic love - there’s love of life, love for our parents and children, love gone wrong, love of God, love of art and more.

Dear Mike, > >Thank you for your enquiry. > >The Glen was built by James Garwood who arrived in Akaroa in 1858. > >Paddy's sirname was McBride, her brother in law was Eric Little, publican of >the Bruce Hotel, you may remember him. > >We do have early images of The Glen available at our museum, unfortunatly we >have no facilities to scan them for you. > >Regards, > >Cotrina MacLeod >museum assistant > > >-----Original Message----- >From: Mike Milne  >Sent: Friday, December 03, 2004 1:21 PM >To: akmus@xtra.co.nz >Subject: > > >I am seeking information on the "Glen" where I lived with a lady I only knew >as Paddy about 1 mile from town on the coast. It has now been replaced by >many homes can you direct my search in any way? I bicycled to the school >every day, maybe I was even registered at the public school in 1960-62? I >was there only a few months,competed in school field day...loved the town >more than anywhere, and I lived in Paris London and all over Canada Edit Text


Cottage in Akaroa
 
 

          History
This information was taken from notes at the Akaroa Museum left by Mrs. Daphne Harrison, owner of the property in in the 1960's and curator or the Akaroa Museum. "This section of land was originally owned by a Frenchman by the name of Guindon who was one of the early French settlers. He was to sell the land to Mr. H.C. Orbell who was to build this house in about 1898. Mr. Orbell was a solicitor who also served on the Borough Council and was also Mayor of Akaroa. Mr. Orbell was later to sell to Mr. Thomas who was town Clerk of Akaroa for many years. After Mr. Thomas's death the place was let to various people for private residence before being sold in 1945 to Mr. Ernest Giddens, a retired farmer who sold it to his daughter and son-in-law, Mr.and Mrs. F.R.J Harrison, who sold it in 1973 to Mr. and Mrs. Frank Driver of Christchurch." Daphe Harrison also wrote at that time that the building...

 

 

 
 
Lake Dunstan-NZ

March 2, 2005 
 
Subject :  Akaroa
Hi there, I read your message in the guestbook of Akaroa.
                                    We worked at the Bruce Hotel from about November 1960 for
                                    several months. It was the loveliest place and plan for 
                                    a revisit this year sometime. We are from Sydney and a 
                                    lot of years have passed. We have kept in touch with a 
                                    couple of friends we made while we were there so will
                                    catch up with them also. Do you think we may have met 
                                    way back then?  I would like to hear of your memories
                                    of the place sometime,   Regards,  Gail
                                    

History
The arrival of Presbyterianism in Akaroa followed closely the arrival of Presbyterianism in Canterbury. In 1856, the Rev. Charles Fraser was inducted Minister of St. Andrew's Christchurch, and that same year he presided at the first Presbyterian service in Akaroa. Worship was conducted in the morning in English and in the evening in French. The group gathered at the home of Mrs. Elizabeth Brown, a Scott Presbyterian who had come to Akaroa in 1843. A dividing wall between the family kitchen and living room had been removed to accommodate the congregation. On 23 January, 1860, on the site of the present church, a small church built by Jean-Baptiste. Eteveneaux was opened by the Rev. Fraser and named 'Bon Accord'. (Bon Accord was moved and is now at 63 Rue Lavaud). Services on the Peninsula were held in the Akaroa church and in the school room at Pigeon Bay, being conducted mainly by laymen. Initiated largely by the Presbyterians at Pigeon Bay, a move was made to obtain a minister for the district from Scotland, and in late 1862 the Rev. George Grant arrived to serve as Akaroa's first resident minister. However, after 16 months Grant accepted a call to Christchurch, where he became the minister of St. Paul's and for the next 10 years Akaroa was without a minister. In 1874 this situation was remedied by the arrival of the Rev. W. Douglas and during his ministry the house at 73 Rue Balguerie was built as the church manse in 1877. Church membership was only about 40, but soon Rev. Douglas was conducting services at Akaroa, Pigeon Bay, Head of the Bay, German Bay and Robinson's Bay in rotation on Sundays, with weekday services in Little Akaloa, Le Bons Bay and Wainui. When the Rev. W. Douglas arrived in Akaroa in 1874, the old church, Bon Accord, unused for 10 years had fallen into disrepair "broken windows, leaking roof, crazy walls creaking like a basket at every blast of wind…". He raised nearly £100 and had it repaired. In 1881 he accepted a call to Hokitika. Rev. D. McLennan was minister from 4 May 1885 to 4 June 1890. By then the 25 year old church was too small and the congregation decided to build a new church on the same site. The old building was sold and removed and the present church, designed by Mr. Whitelaw of Christchurch and built by T. Gee at a cost of £500 was opened free of debt on 13 June 1886. In 1916 the present church hall was designed by H. Haylock, descendant of one of Akaroa's earliest immigrants, Charles Haylock. (Note - according to the Lyttelton Times of 10 September 1856, the Rev. Charles Fraser, Presbyterian Minister will preach at Akaroa on 21 September, so the 1857 date given in the Presbyterian leaflet

During this time, and as a local authority on the French settlement of Akaroa, Waeckerle helped H.C. Jacobson write the "Tales of Banks Peninsula" in 1883. Upon his death in 1901, he was recognized as the last of the adult settlers from the Comte de Paris still resident in Akaroa, and heralded for his pioneering achievements which contributed so much to the early years of the town. The cottage which bears Waeckerle's name stands as a visible reminder of his life and work in Akaroa, but more importantly, perhaps it serves to remind us of the German immigrants who were amongst the first European settlers in New Zealand when they arrived in 1840. Christian Jacob Waeckerle had one daughter, Caroline. With her husband Robert Bayley, she managed the hotel next door for many years. Caroline and Robert had one daughter, Agnes, who married Edward Ernest Nutt. They had three daughters, but as none had any children, the family died out. The cottage stayed in the family for a long time and was still used in the 1970s by Waeckerle’s great granddaughter, Rita Hamilton. The Waeckerle’s family grave is in the Anglican cemetery where Christian Jacob, Marie Judith, Caroline, Robert and infant Alice lie beneath a towering monument topped by a shrouded urn. Leading down to the main Akaroa beach is the Rita Hamilton memorial ramp. Rita was the last of the Waeckerle family. Family Tree Christian Jacob Waeckerle Born - 3 May 1815, Emmingden, Baden, Germany Married - Marie Judith Eteveneaux on 21 April 1842 at Akaroa Died - 12 April 1901, Akaroa Marie Judith Eteveneaux Born - 17 Nov 1825 Bletterans, Jura, France Died - 16 July 1880 Akaroa Descendants of Jacob and Marie Waeckerle Caroline Born - 1 Oct, 1856, Akaroa Married - Robert Bayley, 1 June, 1874, St. Peters Died - 18 June 1934 Descendants of Caroline and Robert Bayley Un-named female Born - 28 Feb 1871 Died - 6 Mar 1871 Agnes Caroline Born - 23 April 1877 Married - Edward Ernest Nutt 18 June 1901 Died ? Alice Constance Born - 19 Oct 1878 Died - 18 June 1879 Descendants of Agnes and Ernest Nutt Vera Agnes Born 22 July 1902, Motukarara Died 27 Jan 1923 Rita Gladys Born 22 June 1904 Married - Hamilton Died ? Eileen Myrtle Born 16 July 1906 Little River Died? Eileen was a very successful golfer. Green and Stephen came out in 1857 and 1860 respectively. Henry trained as a pharmacist and became a Mayor of Akaroa, and Stephen who trained as an artist became a nurseryman. Built soundly of totara this house is very similar in plan to its neighbour at 113 Rue Jolie but has the projecting bay to the right and has a trellised verandah decoration. Stephen had studed at the South Kensington School of Design prior to coming to Akaroa in 1860 and taught painting at the French Farm School. He was a keen nursery man and this could account for the trellis verandah rather than the fretted timber trim of No. 113. There are some very old camellia trees still flourishing in front of the house. Stephen married Elizabeth Ellen Pavitt on 29 April, 1862. The ceremony was performed at Anglican church by the Reverend W.J. Aylmer. (The Pavitt family had come to Akaroa on the Monarch in 1850.) Stephen and Elizabeth went on to have 11 children. When Stepen left Akaroa in 1889, the house with 15 acres of land was sold to Francois Narbey, who came to New Zealand in 1849. He spent a year in the Australian Gold fields, returning in 1855 and settled at Long Bay. In 1857 he married Mary Magee and went on to have 18 children. In 1882, he acquired the house next door (117) as a townhouse for his family, and then, in 1889, he bought this as his town house, and Will Watkins moved into 117. Extra accommodation was needed and the sleep out was built to the left of the house. Later Francois and Mary lived here full time when they were old, cared for by their daughter's Rose and Clara. His daughter Rose purchased No 113 Rue Jolie in 1905, but never lived in it, and inherited this property after her father's death in 1913. Some of the land was sold prior to her death in 1935, then Archibald and Clara Narbey administered the property until in 1967 it was transferred to Mary and Huia Narbey. They retained the land but sold the house in 1973 to Barbara Allison author of the book "An Akaroa Precinct", from which much of the information on the houses in this area has been sourced.

A

Heating and refrigeration: the plant in the attached photo is a 7MW thermal
fluid heater (white unit in the background behind the crane hook) with a
duplex process pump skid destined for a Chevron off shore oil platform in
the Gulf of Thailand. It is used to bring the crude up to a process
temperature of 120deg F at which point the residual seawater is removed
before the crude is pumped onshore at the rate of 85,000 barrels a day.

Feel free to publish any of this information .


Best regards

Nigel Taylor
Engineering Manager
Aquaheat Industries Limited
(ph) +64 4 2325179
(fax) +64 4 2324170

-----Original Message-----
From: Mike Milne Sent: Wednesday, 16 February 2005 8:19 a.m.
To:
ntaylor@aquaheat.co.nz

New Zealand General Facts

History

The original inhabitants of New Zealand were the Maori. It is estimated that these Polynesians arrived in several migration 'waves' in New Zealand about 1000 years ago. On a voyage of discovery, Dutch navigator Abel Tasman sailed up the West Coast of New Zealand in 1642, but did not stay long after his only attempt at landing on New Zealand's shores was repelled by the Maori. New Zealand was not rediscovered by Europeans until 1769 when the British naval captain, James Cook, and his crew, became the first Europeans to lay claim to New Zealand.

It was not until 1840 that any formal agreement was signed between the Maori people of New Zealand and the European settlers. This agreement, known as the Treaty of Waitangi, is New Zealand's founding document. The signing of the Treaty between over 500 Maori Chiefs and representatives of the British Crown, is commemorated annually on February 6 as New Zealand's national day - Waitangi Day.

New Zealand became a self-governing British colony in 1856 and then a Dominion in 1907. It took until 1947 however before New Zealand became fully independent.

Geography and Climate

New Zealand is located in the southern Pacific Ocean, approximately 1,600 kilometres (995 miles) south-east of Australia. New Zealand is comprised of two main islands (the North and South Islands) and several smaller islands of which the combined total land area is 270,534 sq. kms (104,454 sq. mls - approximately 36 times less than the US). It is similar in size to Colorado and somewhere in between the size of Japan and the United Kingdom.

New Zealand’s geography includes spectacular landscapes incorporating the vast mountain chain of the Southern Alps (larger than the French, Austrian and Swiss Alps combined), the volcano region of the North Island, fiords, glaciers, lakes, rainforests and extensive grassy plains.

Highest point: Mount Cook (3,754 m or 12313 ft)
Deepest lake: Lake Hauroko (462 m 1515 ft)
Largest lake: Lake Taupo (606 km or 234 miles)
Longest river: Waikato River (425 km or 264 miles long)
Largest glacier: Tasman Glacier (29 km or 18 miles long)
Deepest cave: Nettlebed, Mount Arthur (889 m or 2916 ft)
Length of coastline: 15,811 km (9824 miles)

New Zealand experiences summer from December – February and winter from June – August. The climate is temperate with little extreme. Any huge variations in temperature can be accounted for by the combination of the mountainous geography and prevailing westerly winds.

 

Mean daily maximum Temp.

Bright Sunshine Hours

Mean annual Rainfall mm

Jan

Jul

°C

Auckland

23.8

15.1

2,071

1,106

Wellington

20.3

11.2

2,024

1,269

Christchurch

22.6

11.1

2,066

645

Dunedin

18.9

9.9

1,595

799

Source: Statistics New Zealand, New Zealand In Profile 1998

Government

New Zealand is an independent state of the Commonwealth. The Queen is represented in New Zealand by the Governor General, Her Excellency Right Honorable Dame Silvia Cartwright. The democratic government operates under the Mixed Member Proportional (MMP) Parliamentary system of 120 seats (of which 67 Members of Parliament are from geographic areas and 53 from political parties). The Government is led by coalition partners - the Labour Party and United Future. The Prime Minister of New Zealand is the Right Honorable Helen Clark.

Leisure & Tourism

New Zealanders are heavily involved in outdoors activities. Our national image and the lifestyles of the population have been largely shaped by our involvement in a wide variety of sports and leisure activities. It is often said that sports and leisure are the predominant focus of the New Zealand cultural identity, for example, New Zealand’s involvement in international rugby.

Tourism generated over $5.9 billion in foreign exchange for the year ended September 2002 and attracted more than 2 million international visitors in the year ended November 2002. New Zealand is a popular holiday destination for visitors from Australia, North America, the United Kingdom and Japan.

Primary Production

Agriculture and horticulture, forestry, fisheries, energy and minerals are the primary natural resources of New Zealand. The most valuable of these product groups, providing a high proportion of New Zealand’s export earnings is agriculture and horticulture which incorporates the production of sheepmeat, beef, wool, dairy produce and hides, deer, goats and cereal products. In fact, agricultural products total more than 50% of all New Zealand exports.

Getting the Lions Share
“Football is not a matter of life and death – it’s much more important than that.” While this well-worn adage may be slightly overstating the case, for New Zealand, the 2005 British and Irish Lions Tour is certainly not just a matter of rugby.

  • New Zealand was the first country to give women the vote (1893).
  • It was probably a New Zealander, Richard William Pearse who took the world’s first flight -nearly two years before the Wright Brothers in the United States (this however cannot be proved). On 31 March 1902 Pearse managed to fly his home-made aircraft 91 metres in a field near Timaru.
  • There are more golf courses in New Zealand per capita of population, than any other country in the world (over 400 golf courses for 3.7 million people).
  • Auckland has the largest number of boats per head of population than any other city in the world.
  • William Hamilton, a Canterbury farmer, developed and perfected the propellerless jet boat based on the principle of water jet propulsion. Following this, Hamilton went on to invent the hay-lift, an advanced air compressor, an advanced air conditioner, a machine to smooth ice on skating ponds; the water sprinkler and also contributed to the improvements of hydro-power.
  • A New Zealander, Sir Edmund Hillary, was the first person to climb Mount Everest (with Sherpa Tenzing Norgay in 1953).
  • Baron Ernest Rutherford, a New Zealander, was the first person in the world to split the atom (in 1919). Rutherford also succeeded in transmitting and detecting ‘wireless waves’ a year before Marconi, but left this work to pursue researching radioactivity and the structure of the atom at Trinity College in Cambridge, England. Rutherford was awarded the Nobel Prize for his work
  • New Zealand is the first country in the world to see each new day.
  • Curio Bay in Southland is one of the world’s most extensive and least disturbed examples of a petrified forest, (the forest is approximately 180 million years old).
  • New Zealand was the first country in the world to have a government department for tourism. In 1901 the Department of Tourist and Health Resorts was created.
  • Wellington has more cafes and restaurants per capita than New York.
  • New Zealand is the birthplace of the meringue dessert known as the ‘Pavlova’, named after the famous ballerina Anna Pavlova.
  • The old Government Building in Wellington is the largest wooden structure in the southern hemisphere (8200 square metres).
  • The vineyards of Central Otago, New Zealand, are the southern most vineyards in the world (45° South).
  • Nelson was the first city in the world to formalise the eight-hour working day.
New Zealand won the first ever Rugby World Cup in 1987. The New Zealand Women’s Rugby Team won the Women’s Rugby World Cup in 1998.

Saturday Oct 6/07: A Day of International Action for a Free Burma      Wellington, NZ
12:00pm - 1:30pm
Civic Square, next to public library
Victoria Street
Wellington
http://vuwac.facebook.com/event.php?eid=5045978289&ref=mf

*Christchurch*
6 October, 2007
http://ubc.facebook.com/event.php?eid=5408623692

*DUNEDIN*
Saturday, October 6, 2007
12:00pm - 1:30pm
UPPER OCTAGON
OCTAGON
Dunedin

MY NZ!
New Zealand flag, c.1901
Fishing Trips Auckland to the Bay of Plenty!
MIKE'S MARINE
Stopovers include  historic NZ sites!
Three day-two night. One night cruise with star gazing guide!
Round trip, all costs included: $999 US
 cheaper rates for multiple bookings (max. of 8 bookings)
please email spreadtheword75@hotmail.com
for our members only magazine...
get up to the minute fish stories!

 Lake Wakatipu, 1950s.

.visit our history at......http://fachefiles.tripod.com/

1/10/07 Southern Ocean 7.4 quake hits New Zealand A large earthquake which struck in the Southern Ocean was widely felt throughout the lower South Island.The 7.4 quake was recorded at 6.23pm and was located about 200 kilometres from the sub-antarctic Auckland Islands. A spokesman from the Institute of Geological and Nuclear Sciences says the quake was also felt in Bluff, Dunedin, and Queenstown. Locals reported feeling gentle and slow rolling motion, which lasted about six seconds. There have been no reports of damage.The Ministry of Civil Defence and Emergency Management issued a tsunami advisory, but it was withdrawn a short time later.A second quake in the same general area struck at 10.47 last night. It measured 6.8 and was located 230 kilometres south-west of the Snares Islands or 440 km south-west of Invercargill, at a depth of 12 kilometres.

According to GNS Science, yesterday morning's earthquake - which came just as the All Blacks were wrapping up their match against Romania - measured 4.7 on the Richter scale. It happened at 1.12am and was centred 10km northeast of the township at a depth of 2km. An aftershock measuring 4.5 on the scale followed one minute later. GNS Science said it would have been felt in Tauranga, Whakatane and Kawerau and was the largest event in a long-running swarm of quakes near Matata. Whakatane resident Sandy Shallcross said she and two friends were watching a DVD when they felt the tremors."It shook my house all right. It was a good shake and it rolled. They always frighten me. There were two good jolts in a row."She said the earthquake had put her on edge, and she was readying herself to take cover but it was over before she could act. Lynn Honan at Matata's motor camp said the noise was followed by a sharp shock. "It was like boom, boom." On Friday, a 3.7 magnitude quake struck near Matata, and six deeper quakes, ranging between 3 and 4.9, were recorded on Wednesday, with two further shakes last Monday and Tuesday. The first in the series was on September 17. GNS Science volcanologist Brad Scott said last week that Mt Ruapehu's eruption on Tuesday was unrelated to the series of earthquakes in the eastern Bay of Plenty.Ruapehu from the Desert RoadComposite satellite image of Ruapehu Composite satellite image of Ruapehu

Helen ClarkHelen Clark and her governments Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade last week warned New Zealanders not to travel to Myanmar - previously known as Burma - following a military crackdown on anti-government protesters which has left at least 13 people dead. Hundreds more, including many Buddhist monks, have been jailed after Myanmar's ruling generals unleashed security forces on demonstrators to put down the biggest wave of public dissent in the Southeast Asian nation for 20 years.

OUTWARD BOUND NEW ZEALAND

Outward Bound New Zealand lies within the labyrinth of waterways of Marlborough Sounds, where the mountains met the sea. Located at Anakiwa, at the northeast corner of the South Island of New Zealand, the school has access to the rivers, bush, sea and nearby Rainbow Mountains, providing an ever-changing and challenging classroom in an extraordinarily beautiful environment.

The school focuses on the transition from youth to adulthood and over 80 percent of students are between the ages of 17 and 26. Every month of the year, a group of young students sets out on a 21-day course. Shorter courses are also offered for adults, corporations and special groups, including students with physical and learning disabilities, and parents together with their teenagers.

Activities include sailing in traditional gaff-rigged cutters, sea/river kayaking in the Marlborough waterways, solo  experiences for reflection and goal-setting, a high ropes course set in a grove of magnificent kahikatea trees, bush expeditions in a beautiful native beech forest. Opportunities also include creative-expressive activities, rock climbing/abseiling, community service and general fitness activities, including running, swimming and aerobics. 

For more information on Outward Bound New Zealand, go to: www.outwardbound.co.nz

Poem by Shayne (Denison) Sawyer

The tree clad mountainous beauty
of the
Queen Charlotte Sound
,
her pristine waters, blue-green
clap at the thick hull of the
Cook Strait
ferry
gliding to her docking in
Picton Harbor.

A small white trawler bobs a greeting
waiting for her fresh round of youthful occupants
primed and psyched for three weeks
of hellionous existence, pitied only by those
who had endured, leaving their legacy etched in
the wooden bunks of the watch cabins.

Anakiwa sits at the innermost reach
of the finger-like inlets of the saltwater sound.
A tribute to Cobham and his dream that
the young should be pressed and forged
in the wilds of nature and being refined,
should endure and overcome.

We scaled the yellow cliffs, up to where
hawks circled the valley on the wind currents,
then absailed on a thin rope to the narrow path,
where we caught our breath and screamed out
to any who would hear, that we had been victorious.

We each sat in our own heavy, fiberglass kayak,
waiting for our turn to be tipped into the cold sea.
Who would panic at being trapped upside down?
The salty water ran like a bandit up my nose to the sore place
as my head appeared above the March-cold water.

Soon we would be paddling down the mountain rivers
through the white water and over the waterfalls.
What exhilaration I felt at seeing the nose of my kayak
burst out over the falls into the air, then plummet to the river below.
Not once or twice, but many times and even backwards until
we had mastered the falls and our fears.

We sailed a jolly old vessel, a replica of Captain Cook's
life boats, wide and strong with one mast and a sail.
A hand-held rudder and twelve long oars, rowed in Viking style
when the wind did not comply with our wishes.
Three long days of rowing blistered my palms when we turned
for home. We eased into a tail wind and released the spinnaker
and sailed easily by the
Cook Strait ferry.

We were awed by the mountains around us.
Lush, thick, too many shades of green to count.
We explored the native bush and lost our way
many times, with compass and map.
Trig-station after trig-station we made our way
to the peaks, where alpine flowers nestled humbly among
great boulders and the clouds bowed down before us.

There on the mountain tops the world seemed immense.
The fields far below were patchwork art and the
blue ocean fingers of the sound wound their sparkling way
through drowned valleys to rocky shores and nikau palms.
The air smelled thin and dry in my nostrils,
and dashed about my face like a puppy's licking tongue.

Solo embraced my bruised body, weary from bush watch.
The narrow, shelly beach mine, for three days
unhindered and free, no questions or answers, no conversations.
The wekas, the wetas, the thunderheads and me.
I kicked in the door of inhibition and threw off my clothes
to roll with abandon on the tepid sand.

The white trawler's bow seemed to grin
as I hugged my new mates good-bye.
We'll keep in touch, we promised.
I did for a while and then my new life
poured in over me, consuming my every thought.

I revisited Anakiwa several years ago.
The kayaks were a little thicker and the cliffs
were worn slightly. The bunks in the watch cabins
told new stories and the white trawler was beached
having her barnacled-bottom scraped.
But the mountains were unchanged and still,
timelessly erect against the clear blue sky.

alumni@outwardbound.co.nz

Sur La Pousse...An easier option is to use a web-based ride sharing service such as BUG Ride (website http://pacific.bugride.com), which allows travellers to both offer lifts and search for a ride around New Zealand

 

‘God of Nations’, 1994

World Cup - the final insult . . . 15 May 2005 By GREG FORD The cheapest seat at the 2011 World Cup final will be a whopping $700. That's the scenario facing the New Zealand Rugby Union if it is successful in its bid to host the tournament. The Sunday-Star Times has been told the exorbitant ticket costs were a consequence of New Zealand's small stadiums and the NZRU's need to maximise gate-takings, which is the only revenue stream for the host nation. It is understood a financial analysis by a joint NZRU and government bid office set up earlier this year revealed

The 1888-89 ‘Native’ rugby team was composed of New Zealand-born players and included just four non-Māori. They were not the first New Zealand team to play overseas but they were the first to wear a black uniform with a silver fern, shown in this photograph. The black uniform was made official by the New Zealand Rugby Union a few years later at the suggestion of Thomas Ellison, who had played for the ‘Natives’.

Church of the Good Shepherd on Lake Tekapo, S.I.

Wellington City 1841
Heaphy, Charles 1820-1881 :Thorndon Flat and part of the city of Wellington. [April, 1841]

UP FRONT KIWI: Deane Mooney with members of his rugby club Leicester Forest who won a dream trip to New Zealand for the Lions tour. Mr Mooney, from Napier, moved to England seven years ago.

Deck of cards.


Short Forecast for all New Zealand

Experience the islands of French Polynesia aboard the Paul Gauguin

Spend a week exploring the islands of French Polynesia and completely renewing your mind and spirit. Options abound aboard and ashore.  Indulge in the soothing ministrations of the Carita Spa, for example. Don a pareo and sip a mai tai on deck. Get your scuba diving certification while vacationing aboard the #1 cruise ship in the world*! You will find the Paul Gauguin to be the perfect companion in whatever diversion you choose.

Only aboard the Paul Gauguin:

  • Gratuities - Included
  • Stocked Bar in Stateroom - Included
  • Wine with Luncheon and Dinner - Included
  • Soft Drinks, Mineral Water, Juices - Included
  • Snorkeling Gear, Sea Kayaking, Waterskiing - Included
  • Private Motu with Lavish Barbecue and Complimentary Drinks - Included


Art deco city of Napier




The central North Island region of Ruapehu, just south of Lake Taupo
THE LORD OF THE RINGS

The town of Edoras, heart of the kingdom of Rohan, created on the summit of Mt Sunday. It was the Second Age of Middle Earth and the Dark Lord Sauron had made a ring with which he meant to rule the world. But he was overthrown and his ring was taken from him which was






THE SITES WHERE FILMING TOOK PLACE:

MATAMATA - Hobbiton
TONGARIRO NATIONAL PARK - Mordor, Mt Doom
RANGITIKEI RIVER - Anduin
OTAKI - Hobbiton woods and roads
KAITOKE - Rivendell
UPPER HUTT - Isengard, Minas Tirith, Minas Mogul and Helm's Deep
WELLINGTON - Bree, The Shire, Mines of Moria, Cirith Ungol, Weathertop hillside
TAKAKA HILL - Chetwood Forest
MT OWEN - Dimrill Dale
MT SUNDAY - Edoras
SOUTHERN ALPS - Misty Mountains
TWIZEL - Pelennor Fields
ARROWTOWN - Ford of Bruinen
GLENORCHY - Lothlorien, Fangorn and Amon Hen
MAVORA LAKES - Nen Hithoel
TE ANAU - Dead Marshes
IDA VALLEY - Pl


a


Takaka Hill east of Nelson was used to shoot scenes for the Chetwood Forest.

ins of Rohanthen lost for many generations until the day the young Hobbit, Bilbo Baggins, accidentally found it carelessly dropped by Gollum in a tunnel deep within the Goblin mountain home.

As Bilbo grew old, the Dark Lord Sauron re-established himself and began to search for his long lost ring. He passes the ring onto his young nephew, Frodo Baggins, and so begins the desperate attempt by a small fellowship of elves, dwarves, hobbits and occasionally a wizard to keep the ring from Sauron and destroy it in the fires of Mt Doom from whence it was made.





The Kepler Mire was used to shoot scenes of the Dead Marshes. Kepler Mire is the largest of the wetlands in the Te Anau Basin wetland complex and is the largest known string bog in New Zealand. It is a very rare type of wetland in the Southern Hemisphere as it is found mostly in arctic conifer forest in high northern latitudes.



Mt Owen is located in the Kahurangi National Park. The park covers 452,000 hectares and is the second largest park in New Zealand. Located in the northwestern corner of the South Island many of the features seen in Kahurangi National Park are unique to New Zealand. Mt Owen was used to shoot scenes of Dimrill Dale.
.




The Ida Valley, inland from Dunedin, was used for filming scenes from the Plains of Rohan.
 The weather in New Zealand can be changeable, and experiencing four seasons in one day is quite possible.

The north of New Zealand is mainly sub-tropical while the south is temperate with around 10°C temperature variation between winter and summer. Central Otago in the lower South Island has temperature extremes similar to a continental climate.

The warmest months are December through to March, and the coldest, from June to August. The average maximum temperatures range between 20 - 25°C (68-77°F) in summer and 10-15°C (50-60°F) in winter.

Milford Sound

Milford Sound
Milford Sound in New Zealand's Fiordland

It is impressive, but this towering scenery would be much better without the rain. Instead, a misty curtain veils the landscape.

The view is from P&O megaliner Star Princess, in which passengers are filled with anticipation . . . until they sail into New Zealand's Milford Sound and the relentless rain.

"It is a wonderful bonus," insists one passenger standing by the ship's rails to take in the scenery from the best vantage point. Her clothes are wet, her hair dripping and droplets of water fall off the bridge of her nose to resemble the nearby waterfalls

 

The 30 highest mountains are all within the Southern Alps, a chain that forms the backbone of the South Island.

  1. Aoraki/Mount Cook - 3754 m (12,316 ft)
  2. Mount Tasman - 3498 m (11,476 ft)
  3. Mount Dampier - 3440 m (11,286 ft)
  4. Mount Vancouver - 3309 m
  5. Mount Silberhorn - 3279 m (10,758 ft)
  6. Mount Malte-Brun - 3198 m
  7. Mount Hicks - 3194 m
  8. Mount Lendenfeld - 3194 m (10,502 ft)
  9. Mount Graham
  10. Mount Torres - 3163 m (10,377 ft)
  11. Mount Sefton - 3157 m (10,358 ft)
  12. Mount Teichelmann - 3160 m (10,367 ft)
  13. Mount Haast - 3138 m (10,295 ft)
  14. Mount Elie de Beaumont - 3109 m (10,200 ft)
  15. La Perouse - 3079 m (10,102 ft)
  16. Douglas Peak - 3081 m (10,108 ft)
  17. Mount Haidinger - 3066 m (10, 059 ft)
  18. Mount Magellan
  19. Mount Malaspina
  20. The Minarets - 3065 m (10,056 ft)
  21. Mount Aspiring - 3033 m (9951 ft)
  22. Mount Hamilton - 3022 m (9915 ft)
  23. Mount Dixon
  24. Glacier Peak - 3007 m (9865 ft)
  25. Mount De La Beche - 2992 m (9816 ft)
  26. Aiguilles Rouges - 2966 m (9731 ft)
  27. Mount Nazomi - 2962 m (9718 ft)
  28. Mount Darwin - 2961 m (9715 ft)
  29. Mount Chudliegh - 2952 m (9685 ft)
  30. Mount Annan, New Zealand - 2947 m (9669 ft)
    Mitre Peak, Milford Sound

Report: All Blacks fly half Carlos Spencer bound for Northampton

WELLINGTON, New Zealand 28/04/05 All Blacks fly half Carlos Spencer has signed with English club Northampton, a New Zealand newspaper reported on Friday.
 Spencer confirmed he met Northampton officials during a recent visit to Britain and the club's millionaire owner, Keith Barwell, told British newspapers it had signed a "world-class player."
 The New Zealand Herald reported Friday that Spencer, 29, concluded a deal with Northampton that might take him to Britain before the British and Irish Lions arrive in New Zealand to tour in June.
 Spencer has sought an early release from his contracts with the Auckland and New Zealand Rugby Unions.
 Northampton will lose fly halfs Shane Drahm and Paul Grayson at the end of the current season, and targeted Spencer as a replacement, the Herald said.
 Barwell said in media interviews that Northampton had Spencer in its sights.
 "We don't deny that Carlos Spencer was here," he said.
 Spencer has played 35 Tests for the All Blacks since 1997, and was the team's third-highest points-scorer in Tests. 
 

WELCOME TO MY NZ...........FAQS AT BOTTTOM

many homes destoyed by a tornado that swept through Greymouth /03/05. The tornado left nine families homeless and caused millions worth of damage. It just missed the main shopping centre and twisted its way up the Grey River before crossing to a lagoon across town and up into the hills, cutting a half-kilometre-wide swathe that ended with clusters of roofing iron dotted through the green hills behind Greymouth. With the amount of debris flung around by the twister, townspeople last night were calling it a miracle that no one was killed, although three people were injured.

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
AUSSIE ANGUISH
08.04.05

An intermediate school is calling in sniffer dogs to search children as young as 11 for fear drugs are finding their way into the playground. Birkdale Intermediate, on the North Shore, has warned its parents and pupils that "drug dogs" will come to the school to carry out random checks.
A former policeman, now with a private firm, will come with the dogs on an unannounced date to check the pupils and their bags. It is understood to be the first time an intermediate school has taken such strong measures, and one drug agency has criticised the precaution as heavy-handed. But a scare tactic is not usually a good way of dealing with the problem and I'm surprised an intermediate principal would think it was." Education was a more effective way of dealing with any drug-related problems, Mr Bell said. That criticism was backed by Trish Grant, from the Commissioner for Children's Office, who said sniffer dogs could be a traumatic experience for some young children. She also questioned the legal validity of the plan.

Don and Janet McMillan came to Matata in the Bay of Plenty to retire four months ago.

DESTROYED: Residents are calling Matata a tsunami zone. It is a scene of logs, mud and destroyed houses.

The Taupo couple, both in their sixties, had plans to catch whitebait and grow tamarillos, silverbeet and lemons.

Retirement dream lying under 5m of mud and silt

Yesterday they were cleaning mud and debris from inside and around their house. A red sticker showed the house had been declared uninhabitable.

A "weather bomb" exploded in the valley on Wednesday night far behind the house and let go a torrent of rain.

The floodwaters gathered in a "dinky little stream" and swept down carrying logs, boulders and river silt across the railway line, and picking up the house across the road from the McMillans.

The couple had time only to escape through the roof as a wall of water suddenly rose off the street and into their property.

"It was like a tidal wave. We watched it come over the road and then rise. Within minutes it was a sea of mud coming into our house," Mrs McMillan said.

She was at loss to comprehend the situation. "It's devastating."

Fire service crews arrived to rescue the pair as they were about to climb on to the roof.

The house across the road and the owners' boat had come to a halt with tonnes of debris at the front of the McMillans' house

 

 

 

 

Greymouth

 

 

 

Widespread damage after Greymouth tornado

The Despatch and Garlic engineering workshop in Greymouth was battered by the tornado. Picture / Fotopress


Short Forecast for all New Zealand to Midnight on Thursday 31st March

The Despatch and Garlic engineering workshop in Greymouth was battered by the tornado. Picture / Fotopress
 
10.03.05 UPDATE 5.00pm
 

There is disbelief at the widespread damage caused by a tornado in Greymouth this afternoon. Several people are understood to have been injured after the twister ripped through the West Coast town around 1pm. It ripped roofs off buildings, and completely destroyed several businesses. Grey District Mayor Tony Kokshoorn said he could not believe that no-one had been killed. He said you have to see the devastation to believe it. Mr Kokshoorn said the roof of Dispatch Engineering -- one of the biggest buildings in town -- had lifted and came flying through the air towards him as he drove away from council chambers. 

He said he dived into the back seat of the car and hung on while it smashed into the vehicle. 

"There's a lot of destruction -- the tornado's come in from the sea and it's gone right through."

Notorious prison escapee Arthur Taylor, who sparked an armed manhunt in Wellington 20/03/05  has been recaptured but was using a cellphone in jail right up to the time of the escape.

In 1999, the Star-Times revealed that Taylor had two phones in Paremoremo prison - one as "back-up". He hid them in a light switch.

Taylor was charged with assaulting and kidnapping his wife on their wedding day in December, but the charges were dropped after Carolyn Taylor refused to testify. She believed he had escaped to be with her as she had been banned from visiting him in prison for allegedly smuggling in a cellphone battery, which she denies

Police are still hunting convicted killer Manu Aperhama Royal in connection with the escape.

Massive Cyclone Targets Australia

Ingrid was expected to hit northern Queensland state early Thursday (10/03/05).

It bore down on communities spanning north about 220 miles from Port Douglas, a tourist site visited by former President Clinton and a jump-off site for the Great Barrier Reef. Several Aboriginal communities near Coen, a tiny settlement of 250 people, were evacuated ahead of the storm, said Claire Bosanko of Queensland's Counter-Disaster and Rescue Services.

Most communities in the cyclone-prone region have cyclone shelters and evacuation centers. The cyclone was downgraded Wednesday from the maximum category 5 storm to category 4.

Severe cyclones are the Southern Hemisphere equivalent to tropical storms and hurricanes in the Northern Hemisphere.

 

Dreamland is a palate-pleaser. A quaint corner of the North Island has all the makings for relaxation. It is hard to decide what I like most about Wairarapa. The picture-postcard prettiness of pastel-painted colonial towns and quaint rural villages? The fields of lavender hemmed by green hills rolling towards mountain landscapes in the west and, in the east, a rugged coastline that is hauntingly beautiful?

Wairarpara
Wairarpara

There are olive groves, too, and forest parks, not to mention the vineyards of Martinborough and beyond. It's not easy to choose. What's certain is that the air is incredibly clear and sweet, the ambience deeply relaxing.Wairarapa lies in the southeast corner of New Zealand's North Island, an hour or less by car or train from Wellington. Wellingtonians consider it a restful retreat. City slickers from Australia might place it between deep meditation and dreamland.

An earthquake measuring 5.4 on the Richter scale struck the lower North Island at 6.31am today. The quake was centred 40km southeast of Martinborough, at a depth of 20km. The Institute of Geological and Nuclear Sciences said the quake was felt in the Wairarapa and Wellington regions. The quake was the latest in a flurry of seismic activity in recent days. This morning's quake was centred at the same location as seven of ten quakes which shook the Wairarapa and Wellington in a ten-hour period on January 18. The biggest measured 5.3. A 5.5 magnitude quake centred near Upper Hutt struck on January 21 -- the largest in the region for nine years. It was quickly followed by a smaller quake, measuring 3.7. On January 28 the region was rocked by another small earthquake, measuring 3.7 on the Richter scale and centred within 30km of Paraparaumu on the Kapiti Coast.

SANTA'S STONED.....Police in Auckland had to deal with a group of drunken Santas last December. A large group, dressed in Santa suits, began fighting. There were about 30 of them, both men and women, police said they were heavily intoxicated. A Father Christmas and a Mother Christmas were arrested and charged with disorderly behaviour, and the Father Christmas has also been charged with resisting arrest. Police believe the Santas had been drinking since early morning.

More than bad apples in the barrel of cop culture

There has been a lot in the media lately about cop culture. It might surprise many to know that libraries have literally been written about this. So much so, in fact, that some of these scholars now specialise in meta-studies, detailed reviews of what other studies on police culture have shown. Textbooks view cop culture as a patterned set of understandings that help officers to cope with the pressures and tensions confronting police. All organisations have a culture and police forces around the world have been shown to have a distinct one, often compared with other male-dominated and hierarchical occupations such as the military and the firefighting. Issues that arise out of the Senior-Sergeant Anthony Solomona court case are far from unique and show just how transferable what has been learned about other police forces might be to our own. Overseas research has tended to show that police culture is a combination of sense of mission, action-oriented behaviour and cynicism where the emphases on danger, suspicion, isolation, solidarity, pragmatism and authority are all core elements. Part of the answer is provided by the officers who gave evidence in court. When Solomona talked of the assault he was convicted of, he told the court his experience as a police officer had shown that in situations where one person is quite vocal it is important to act quickly. This is true but shows even an experienced officer feels the need to take action and also to assert authority so things do not get out of hand. It is remarkable, in fact, the extent to which similar comments come up in fieldwork done by researchers in other countries. Not to act is to appear to be weak and is to risk letting things escalate and get out of hand.
Sergeant John Nelson, who also gave evidence, was asked about the photograph of a 16-year-old said to be wearing a sign saying, "I belong to Senior Sergeant Solomona". His reply was, "I don't think I could explain the humour in two sentences". Just as police feel the need to assert their authority in relation to someone who is vocal, they also share dark humour the world around. No doubt this is a coping mechanism but it is also a way of expressing their solidarity to one another. As such, dark humour is often said to form part of the canteen culture in the police.
Counties Manukau Police district commander Steve Shortland has told the Herald in response to this case that in every box there's at least one bad apple. This is indeed one of the main ways of understanding police malpractice. As one leading criminology text states: "One set of theories see the problems of policing as the result of psychological weakness in police officers. Often referred to as 'bad apple theories', they suggest that organisational failures result from the actions of a small number of rogue police officers. "Such theories indicate that the solution lies in screening at recruitment, education and strict disciplinary procedures. Not surprisingly, senior police have often favoured the bad apple view." Recent experience in Britain and Australia has turned away from this thinking, because it does not sufficiently take account of possible systemic problems. In England, the police force has grappled with the issue of racism because of a number of well-publicised incidents there. In Australia, racism has also been of concern but corruption has been more of a focus. Unfortunately, New Zealand has a police force with systemic problems in these areas. Nevertheless, it is not sufficient to write off this case by way of the bad apple thesis if our force is to stay intact. After all, as Sergeant Nelson said about the joke photographs, this sort of thing appears to be happening throughout the country. Mistakes many academics have made is to view police culture in an entirely negative way. The reality is that it is often beneficial. Officers in the front line do need to look after each other, and to maintain their authority. As many policemen and women know, however, they also need to treat all they deal with respectfully and as fellow citizens. It's because they have done this in the past that their standing in the community is good. An inquiry by Sir David Tompkins into this matter is to be welcomed. His remit is too narrow, a review of the entire country might have been wiser, in fact, of more help to the police. More importantly, Sir David should note lessons from overseas. The differences between formal policies and informal practice must be kept in mind, as must the distinction between what street cops, on the one hand, and what management cops, on the other, do. The research shows quite clearly that how police higher up think and behave can be very different from how those on the ground do. 

 

New Zealand -- Adam Gilchrist and Simon Katich each hit hundreds in a double-century partnership to leave the first test between New Zealand and Australia hanging in the balance after day three in Christchurch. story.gilchrist.jpg
Gilchrist smashed six more sixes to go third in the all-time 'six' list

Gilchrist smashed 121 off 126 balls and Katich made a patient 118 from 229 deliveries to help Australia get within one run of New Zealand's first innings total of 433.

The Kiwis then survived six overs before the close of play to reach nine without loss in their second innings, a lead of 10 runs

Netball: 14/03/05 England slumped to a 52-30 defeat by New Zealand, the world champions, in the first international in Auckland but an aggressive display by the defence and the return of Olivia Murphy, the captain, after injury will give them confidence for the next match on Wednesday


SHREK: Tarras School pupil Arthur Chapman-Cowen, 7, keeping an eye on celebrity merino sheep Shrek, which was a star attraction during the first day of the Wanaka A & P Show on March 11.
BARRY HARCOURT/Southland Times

sent to ..
15/03/05
I was seeking info on the recent alledged arrest of Hilary Swank at Auckland airport. Do you have any info on this. I have searched site with no luck. Could you respond asap
              mike

OUTWARD BOUND NEW ZEALAND

Outward Bound New Zealand lies within the labyrinth of waterways of Marlborough Sounds, where the mountains met the sea. Located at Anakiwa, at the northeast corner of the South Island of New Zealand, the school has access to the rivers, bush, sea and nearby Rainbow Mountains, providing an ever-changing and challenging classroom in an extraordinarily beautiful environment.

The school focuses on the transition from youth to adulthood and over 80 percent of students are between the ages of 17 and 26. Every month of the year, a group of young students sets out on a 21-day course. Shorter courses are also offered for adults, corporations and special groups, including students with physical and learning disabilities, and parents together with their teenagers.

Activities include sailing in traditional gaff-rigged cutters, sea/river kayaking in the Marlborough waterways, solo experiences for reflection and goal-setting, a high ropes course set in a grove of magnificent kahikatea trees, bush expeditions in a beautiful native beech forest. Opportunities also include creative-expressive activities, rock climbing/abseiling, community service and general fitness activities, including running, swimming and aerobics.

For more information on Outward Bound New Zealand, go to: www.outwardbound.co.nz The aim of education is to impel people into value-forming experiences... to ensure the survival of these qualities:- an enterprising curiosity; an undefeatable spirit, tenacity in pursuit; readiness in sensible self denial and above all, compassion." - Kurt Hahn, 1941  info@outwardbound.co.nz.

Poem by Shayne (Denison) Sawyer

The tree clad mountainous beauty
of the Queen Charlotte Sound,
her pristine waters, blue-green
clap at the thick hull of the Cook Strait ferry
gliding to her docking in Picton Harbor.

A small white trawler bobs a greeting
waiting for her fresh round of youthful occupants
primed and psyched for three weeks
of hellionous existence, pitied only by those
who had endured, leaving their legacy etched in
the wooden bunks of the watch cabins.

Anakiwa sits at the innermost reach
of the finger-like inlets of the saltwater sound.
A tribute to Cobham and his dream that
the young should be pressed and forged
in the wilds of nature and being refined,
should endure and overcome.

We scaled the yellow cliffs, up to where
hawks circled the valley on the wind currents,
then absailed on a thin rope to the narrow path,
where we caught our breath and screamed out
to any who would hear, that we had been victorious.

We each sat in our own heavy, fiberglass kayak,
waiting for our turn to be tipped into the cold sea.
Who would panic at being trapped upside down?
The salty water ran like a bandit up my nose to the sore place
as my head appeared above the March-cold water.

Soon we would be paddling down the mountain rivers
through the white water and over the waterfalls.
What exhilaration I felt at seeing the nose of my kayak
burst out over the falls into the air, then plummet to the river below.
Not once or twice, but many times and even backwards until
we had mastered the falls and our fears.

We sailed a jolly old vessel, a replica of Captain Cook's
life boats, wide and strong with one mast and a sail.
A hand-held rudder and twelve long oars, rowed in Viking style
when the wind did not comply with our wishes.
Three long days of rowing blistered my palms when we turned
for home. We eased into a tail wind and released the spinnaker
and sailed easily by the Cook Strait ferry.

We were awed by the mountains around us.
Lush, thick, too many shades of green to count.
We explored the native bush and lost our way
many times, with compass and map.
Trig-station after trig-station we made our way
to the peaks, where alpine flowers nestled humbly among
great boulders and the clouds bowed down before us.

There on the mountain tops the world seemed immense.
The fields far below were patchwork art and the
blue ocean fingers of the sound wound their sparkling way
through drowned valleys to rocky shores and nikau palms.
The air smelled thin and dry in my nostrils,
and dashed about my face like a puppy's licking tongue.

Solo embraced my bruised body, weary from bush watch.
The narrow, shelly beach mine, for three days
unhindered and free, no questions or answers, no conversations.
The wekas, the wetas, the thunderheads and me.
I kicked in the door of inhibition and threw off my clothes
to roll with abandon on the tepid sand.

The white trawler's bow seemed to grin
as I hugged my new mates good-bye.
We'll keep in touch, we promised.
I did for a while and then my new life
poured in over me, consuming my every thought.

I revisited Anakiwa several years ago.
The kayaks were a little thicker and the cliffs
were worn slightly. The bunks in the watch cabins
told new stories and the white trawler was beached
having her barnacled-bottom scraped.
But the mountains were unchanged and still,
timelessly erect against the clear blue sky.

 
 
16.03.05
 
A senior policeman appointed to help inquire into a "sick" police culture has quit the role after revelations he was once the subject of a complaint about inappropriate behaviour.

Inspector Pieter Roozendaal had been seconded from his complaints investigation role in the North Shore/Waitakere/Rodney District to help the South Auckland inquiry, sparked by the recent trial of Senior Sergeant Anthony Solomona.

Trial judge Bruce Davidson condemned Solomona's conduct, which included photographing a 15-year-old boy wearing a sign that read "I am the property of Senior Sergeant Solomona".

The court was also shown a picture of a machete and axe-wielding policeman posing with a number of other weapons and a sign saying "RIP to Section 4" (the emergency response unit headed by Solomona).

Judge Davidson also talked of a "sick" culture within the police.

Police Commissioner Rob Robinson said an inquiry would determine whether there was evidence of a culture "that condones or encourages acts of violence or other inappropriate treatment toward prisoners, suspects or other persons in the Counties Manukau Police District".

The Office of the Commissioner last night issued a statement which said Mr Roozendaal was involved in an incident where alleged inappropriate language was used.

Mr Roozendaal reportedly said to a man who had been in custody for some hours and been strip searched: "Have you had your beating yet?"

Last night TV3 reported that the comment was made in 1988. Mr Roozendaal was a detective sergeant working in the Counties Manukau district at the time.

Acting Commissioner Steve Long said Mr Roozendaal had indicated to police that he was exonerated from the complaint, but accepted he used words which were construed as "inappropriate humour".

Mr Roozendaal asked to stand down from the inquiry led by a retired High Court judge, Sir David Tompkins.

Mr Long said Mr Roozendaal, who joined police in 1977, had worked hard on the inquiry in the short time it had been set up.

"We will now be looking to quickly fill the role with a new investigator to support Sir David," Mr Long said.

The inquiry team this week called for public submissions and Mr Roozendaal was quoted as saying: "An investigation such as this is reliant on people coming forward and telling their stories."

North Shore/Waitakere/Rodney District Commander Superintendent Roger Carson said last night that he wanted Mr Roozendaal to remain in his job as manager of police professional standards.

Making our own history ...

Opua to Tahiti :
Fair weather and weather straight from hell

The R.Tucker Thompson left Opua, Bay of Islands in New Zealand on Saturday 23rd April. On board there were 6 full time professional crew and 9 voyager crew, sail trainees that would learn the skills of sailing a tall ship during the` course of their adventure. Drawn from countries afar as Sweden and England, Canada and the USA, Australia and Canada, they will be working alongside the Kiwi crew to sail the ship to Canada. 22/09/200521:48 | 

09°05'S 140°12'W  | 223 | 7.5 | ESE |  15 | 989.

Everything was fine for the first few days. The wind was a consistant 20knots from the south west, basically perfect, and we rode the easy swells covering 160 miles a day plus. Life was good onboard and we laughed at how easy this business of ocean sailing was. However this gentleman's sailing was short lived. On the third day the winds started building till it was consistantly 35knots and gusting forty. We reduced our sail area right down and as we cleared the east coast on New Zealand the swells came to play too. 6m swells may not sound that big but let me tell you when you're in the trough and looking up at them coming it tests your nerves a wee bit. People started getting seasick and life onboard was difficult. Simply moving around was difficult as the ship rolled and crashed through the ocean.

That night's weather fax was a somber occasion. A deep deep low had formed to the south of us and things were only going to get worse as a powerful front roared up from the bottom of the southern ocean. The sail trainees were banned from the deck, hatches were battened down, harnesses were required on deck at all times not just after dark like usual. The storm was comming. 

The winds came first. Picking up to a consistant roaring of 45knots and gusting well over fifty. Making it a full gale force system. All we could do was hold tight and run down the face of the building swells, flying only a small stays'l (about 5% of our total sail area) and still moving at over 10 knots. Then the bullys showed up. The swells were an easy 10m and started breaking around us. Not fully but just the tops of them. We took several over the deck and crew were left scrambling to hold fast on whatever they could as we took a temporary soak. We were just holding our own and the mood was nervous and tense. None onboard had ever faced seas this big before and we were terrirfied by its power. The first mate and I were on watch at about 5.30pm and helming was exhausting. Using all my strength to hold her straight as we surfed down the faces. Then it happened. We were comming down the face of a monster, most likely 12-15 m, amd about 100m to port the swell jacked up and broke down its entire face.

To our horror the whole swell starting peaking up right along to were we were and came a crashing down. "HOLD ON!" this time from the mate as I was wrapping my arms around the nearest steel staunchon I could find. The beast came down like thunder from the skys above and I was lifted horizontaly as it engulfed our entire ship. I held my breath and waited for the lifelong seconds to pass before we rose to the surface again and saw the mate lying on the decks next to the helm. Our good ship had taken the beating and shaken the water from her back, rising to fight the next swell.

The Skipper came on deck straight away and gave the order to hove-too. We were no match for this fight so we had to sit it out it the safest way possible. We rounded up into the swells, sheeted the staysil flat and lashed the helm hard to weather. Retired down below and held fast.

The night passed slowly. We sat like that for 12 hours before the swells finally eased enough for us to start making way again. Though they stayed at 6m for a few more days we got back on track and all took with us a strong belief in the ocean's power and dominance, and our own insignificance.

The rest of the voyage never reached such climaxes but was filled with sunny days sailing, eating fresh Mahimahi, telling stories, reading books, and singing shanties (the cook's absolutely excellent, he knows a bundle ) Our first sight of Tahiti was a huge celebration. Its peaks that rise almost straight up to over 2000m are a sight to remember. We reached harbour at 3am on the 10th May and drank till well after sun up.

I searched and believe I have found my paradise...the Marquesas Islands! I include some info on this subject. Please give me your valued input as I am far too romantic and far too impractical in my thinking. Problems I see are the language barrier, however they do speak some French, as do I. Isolation is another, however as I am on the computer 6-8 hrs a day, I believe I could get satellite internet easily, is that true?

12th October : The last leg of their journey at last! The ship departed Rarotonga this morning and will be doing their best to get home as quickly as possible. Recent bad weather systems in the Pacific have hopefully passed through and we wish them a safe passage, today particularly as it is the Ship's 20th birthday!

We all had a big shift to the negative today when Evan annouced we'd be way off schedule if winds didn't improve, and our spare engine cooling pump might not make it all the way to Marquesas, so we'd be at the mercy of winds alone. Fresh water showers were cut off completely now. I guess I'm getting what I bargained for. A flying fish flew on deck this morning and, after admiring its ultra-blue elegance, we used it as bait to catch a fabulous mahi mahi. Amazing to watch the brilliant tourquois and yellows fade from its scales as life passes out of its body.
Tonight we are truly experiencing what it means to be smooth sailing. The moon is in the belly of Scorpio, straight above us, lighting the sails blue-white. There's enough wind to fill our 9 sails and keep us around 5 knots- no engine, just water-filled silence.
The passage to the Marquesas is meant to be a "downhill run" on the Trade winds. We're finally catching them, after a turn to the West, and our ship is like a painting from a storybook. She becomes the image she's been striving for these 2 weeks, with all the rugged elegance and grace she's meant to have; the reason we're all here is clear.

9/11

Our equator-crossing ceremony was hilarious. After a basketful of cold Pacifica beers with lemon- Yes! Beer! Cold!, and photos of the 00'00".00 NS on our GPS's (global positioning systems), King Neptune and two of his cohorts slandered our names, (Polywogs they call those who haven't crossed the equator by sea) one by one, and smeared us with eggs, broth, spice, and other nasty edibles that stuck in our hair and stained our undies funky colors.
Good times.!!!!LAND HO!!!!!
Climbed the rigging and was one of the first to see land as we approached Hiva Oa, the first of the Marquesan Islands. Having had friction with my watch leader earlier, I was totally intolerant of fear or hesitation, and felt comfortable and at ease for the first time.

9/19

Today was an absolutely magical, amazing day in the islands.
We went to church and heard the vibrant, 3 and 4-part harmony the congregation automatically sings hymns in. We sat in the back with disinterested teenaged boys in Bob Marley t-shirts and crying babies. It seems, though it's a Catholic ceremony, the meeting still holds meaning to the pre-missionary Polynesian culture. The cathedral was built on an ancient holy ground, and the event is central to Taiohae life. (the small, but biggest on Nuku Hiva, town we're in)
A kind older woman and young Tahitian friend of hers drove a few of us to some archaelogical ruins and gave us a tour.
I missed the dingy back out to the boat and, stranded a few hours, made buddies with a gaggle of local kids playing in the surf. In my broken French, I taught them to salsa dance, they taught me a local dance and gave me a frangipani lei. We dove off the pier and played in the chocolate-brown, fine smooth sand.

Back on the boat, we took a group out a few hundred meters and swam with manta rays!!!! Huge, gorgeous, harmless creatures, we could swim right beside them, and so glorious it was!

9/20

Tonight a moment outside of time, when a magnificent rumble erupted from the shore. bellowing, gut-shaking rhythms with voices that layered themselves over it. A row of us, leaned out from under the rain cover, stars over our heads, craning to make out signs of dancing. here we were, on a European-style sailing vessel, a tradition that is familiar to us, witnessing a mystery, transfixed by it as those who colonized this land would have been. And the Polynesian people, recreating the traditions of their ancestors. I wonder how long the traditions will maintain, since both ours and theirs are only re-creations.

I feel I am where I want to be. But I don't feel I could possibly understand it all. I only hope am giving it the justice of recognition it deserves.

9/21
Lucky me- I got to see the French Polynesian president address the residents of Nuku Hiva, and hear their dissent and arguments about an impending international airport here, a development that would totally alter the secluded way of life their are now able to maintain- since only sailing vessels really enter here, and very small local planes. I was kicking myself to be so lacking in my French that i could barely follow, and mostly just infer what people were saying.
My little friend Vainui gave me a ring that says "I Love You, THE END", and i stayed at a bungalow with a young local woman who manages the hotel. good night.

AAAAHHH! So much more. there's through Nuku Hiva at least.
Pape'ete will be impending on reaching Rarotonga. I've decided to stay on with the Tucker all the way to New Zealand, where we'll celebrate her 20th birthday in her home port.



I miss movies and ice cream and oreos and soda with ICE CUBES!!! Comforts of home. But it's beautiful here right now.
Going against the wind and not knowing when we'll arrive anywhere is not really so bad when you've got a beautiful sunset and gorgeous crescent moon setting golden over the southwest horizon.

June 23 - 26, 2005 - Victoria, BC
Victoria TALL SHIPS CHALLENGE® 2005
C/oVictoria Tall Ships Society, 19 Bastion Square,
Victoria, BC V8W 1J1, Canada
www.tallshipsvictoria.ca
Telephone : 250 384 2005
Email : info@tallshipsvictoria.ca 
 
 

Frequently found carved in large freestanding wood and stone figures and in high relief on clubs, bowls, dishes, canoe paddles, stiltsteps and many objects of personal adornment, Tiki Ke'a, as he was known to the Marquesans, was most frequently portrayed as a squat, heavy figure of inscrutable mien and menacing power. Carvings of a type found (with local variations) throughout Polynesia invariably show the Tiki figure with hands clasped over a protruding stomach, with large round eyes, a flat but prominent nose and a elliptical mouth. The complete Tiki figure is rarely found in flat low relief decoration, but the face or head alone was frequently used and often incorporated with other nonrepresentational designs on a large variety of Marquesan utensils and artifacts. These abstract design elements which were apparently derived from natural forms, i.e. flora and fauna, became dominant in the decorative repertory. Decorative lashings for canoes and houses, tattoos, wooden utensils and numerous other objects all displayed multiple permutations of these basic forms.

 

By the 15th century, the islands of the Marquesas had entered into a period of rich cultural growth and diversification. Extensive ceremonial activity and increasing rivalry amongst secular and priestly individuals had led to the construction of increasingly massive stone terraces for house and temple structures. Although these structures followed in basic form those of an earlier era, they were now larger and more elaborate. Widespread use was made of cut tufa slabs in the construction of platforms, and monumental stone sculptures also made their appearance. The largest and most important of these stone structures were the Tohua, enormous multi-terraced platforms which were accessible to the common people and used for functions of a community nature or of hierarchical importance. The Tohua Vahangekua, which stands today on the island of Nuka Hiva, is probably the largest, measuring 600 by 80 feet and containing an estimated 240,000 cubic feet of earth fill.

The first European to visit the Marquesas was Alvaro de Mendana, who arrived in 1595, named the islands Las Islas de Marquesa de Mendoza and claimed them for Spain. Although de Mendana's journal described the natives as friendly and welcoming, nevertheless, over 200 of them were killed in separate incidents with the Spaniards.

Nearly two centuries were to pass before the next white visitor, Captain James Cook, arrived in 1774. Although this visit was less traumatic, blood was still spilled. More disastrously, Cook's expedition had the effect of opening the Marquesas to the outside world. Within a relatively short time, other exploring voyages were made and by the early nineteenth century merchants, whalers and missionaries came in numbers to the islands in search of adventure, wealth and/or destiny. With little respect or comprehension for the people upon whom they had intruded, the early European visitors had a dramatic and destructive effect on the Marquesans and their culture. The introduction of firearms, alcohol, and a multitude of diseases decimated the local population and contributed to an element of self-destructive anarchy.

Prior to 1840, missionary influence was slight, but eventually both Protestants and Catholics recognized the possibilities of the Marquesans as converts and each made great efforts to ensure dominance. To further these aims, missionary groups did their best to destroy the traditions of singing and dancing, the use of Marquesan musical instruments, wearing of native dress, kava-drinking, the use of turmeric (it led to immoral ways) and of course, tattooing, which was viewed as a heathen practice. This effectively nullified the power of the priestly and artisan classes and drove yet another nail in the Marquesan coffin. 

In their endeavors, the Catholic missions were enthusiastically supported by the French government, which had formally taken possession of the islands in 1842. With neither side interested in compromise, conflict became a significant component of interaction between the Marquesans and the French. Gratuitous violence which occurred beyond the norms and controls of Marquesan culture engendered a legacy of fear and mistrust and this, coupled with disease, apathy and demoralization resulted in a birth rate that was appallingly low. By 1872, fewer than 6,000 Marquesans were still living. The situation continued to deteriorate until in 1923 only an estimated 2,000 Marquesans remained. Thus, one hundred years of sustained contact had resulted in the almost complete destruction of the Marquesans and their culture.

Today, the Marquesas are still hauntingly beautiful. The great valleys are silent, but imbued with the presence of a once-powerful people. Everywhere the remains of great stone platforms, walled house sites and terraces provide silent testimony of a culture that no longer exists. Exquisite artifacts and tools of daily living (those that remain) are found only in European museums and collections, far from the homeland where they were created and used.

The French still maintain a presence in the Marquesas, although there is little left to govern. Dreams of a thriving commercial and trading center proved illusionary, and although the local birthrate is gradually increasing, the current population numbers are impacted by out-migration to Tahiti and France.

First day cover 3-cent, U.S. Possessions Honolulu, Hawaii, Oct.18, 1937.
 

 
Lodging on Nuku Hiva and Hiva Oa

The primary accommodations among all the Marquesas Islands are located on the islands of Nuku Hiva and Hiva Oa.

These simple, yet elegant hillside lodges are close to the main towns and offer balconies with sweeping views overlooking the bay
Cook's Bay, Moorea
Moorea-Cook's Bay, Moorea
Nuku Hiva-Hatiheu, Nuku Hiva

Hatiheu, Nuku Hiva
Bora Bora: aerial
Bora Bora-Bora Bora: aerial
Where is Tahiti?
the Marquesas

Brel's last days in the Marquesas

In 1975 Jacques and Madly went to live in the Marquesas Islands, setting up home on the island of Hiva-Oa. Enjoying a new lease of life, Brel bought another plane, which he named "Jojo" in memory of his lost friend. He soon transformed "Jojo" into a kind of air-taxi ferrying food and other supplies to the inhabitants of the neighbouring islands.

Brel returned to Brussels twice in the course of 1976 for medical examinations, but, ignoring the doctors' advice he returned to the Marquesas, in spite of the fact that the tropical climate was most unsuitable for his lungs.

In 1977 Brel decid Here is our FAQ page. In this example, we are only providing an answer to the first question, which is  how to contact us and is not linked to an answer page. Please ...

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